Installing Win2K Is Hard

Apparently I’m not the only one who finds the Windows 2000 Installation process to be tedious and ridiculously hard. The folks at LinuxWorld.com asked “Is Windows or Linux easier to install?”, and found the answer was surprising.

Apparently I’m not the only one who finds the Windows 2000 Installation process to be tedious and ridiculously hard. The folks at LinuxWorld.com asked Is Windows or Linux easier to install?, and found the answer was surprising.

You would think that the Microsoft product would win. After all, they’ve been making a user-installable operating system for more than 21 years, and Linux is famously hard to install. That’s the reputation, not the reality.

I’m glad I’m not alone on this one.

No More Bad News

In case you hadn’t noticed, I’ve been posting a lot fewer political items here. It’s not because I think things are looking up, but because I think they’re looking worse and worse. I decided that trying to keep up would (a) be a lost cause, and (b) make this blog terribly boring (not that it isn’t anyway).

In case you hadn’t noticed, I’ve been posting a lot fewer political items here. It’s not because I think things are looking up, but because I think they’re looking worse and worse. I decided that trying to keep up would (a) be a lost cause, and (b) make this blog terribly boring (not that it isn’t anyway).

I am still cataloging the various signs of the apocolypse, in a separate blog that’s mostly a collection of story links and summaries. I call it The Decline and Fall of the American Empire, because I think there are clear signs that America is going to hell in a handbasket, but like frogs in a pot of water, if the heat is brought up gradually, no one will cry out until it’s too late.

At least, that’s my opinion. And as far as I understand the current laws of the United States, I’m still entitled to it.

We’ll see how long that lasts.

RSS Auto-Discovery

I’ve added RSS Auto-Discovery to this site, by modifying the source for monauraljerk, the software that runs this site.

I’ve added RSS Auto-Discovery to this site, by modifying the source for monaural jerk, the software that runs this site.

It was a simple add, and the change in output is small, but this is one more ingredient in that very exciting soup I talked about a while back.

Where Will It End

“Given the lack of public outcry about these shameful laws and rulings, I’m beginning to wonder if very many of you care about your rights. Do you?”

Writing about a recent judicial ruling on the DMCA, Dan Gillmor writes:

Given the lack of public outcry about these shameful laws and rulings, I’m beginning to wonder if very many of you care about your rights. Do you?

I’m convinced Dan’s right. Americans no longer care about their rights, just as long as their cable TV is working. If this keeps up, it won’t be America much longer…

Lying Styles of the Rich and Famous

“[T]here are no honest administrations. But each presidency does bring its own unique style to the task of deceiving the citizenry.”

From Slate’s Lying in Style:

[T]here are no honest administrations. But each presidency does bring its own unique style to the task of deceiving the citizenry. And at least you can derive some truths about a president from the way he chooses to lie to you.

Rewriting History

It would appear that our underachieving president’s record is getting the benefit of a little after-the-fact copyediting.

From The Washington Post:

At a speech in Bridgeport, Conn., President Bush declared that he wanted each American to volunteer for “4,000 years,” a variation of his usual call for “4,000 hours” that produced guffaws in the audience. Later, at a fundraiser, Bush bestowed a new name on Connecticut’s lieutenant governor, Jodi Rell. “I appreciate Lieutenant Governor Judi Kell for being here,” he said. “Great to see you again, Judi.”

Whatever, says Cathleen Hinsch, a spokeswoman for Rell. “You don’t correct the president.”

But the White House does. Both goofs, and accompanying laughter, were stricken from the record — deus ex machina — in the official White House transcripts.

Something Very Exciting Is Going on Right Now

Something really, really exciting is going on in technology right now. It’s not really clear where all this is heading, but the amount of activity, creativity, and energy going into building and combining new Web-based services is large and growing, in a way we haven’t seen since about 1994, when the Internet first started to take off.

Something really, really exciting is going on in technology right now. It’s not really clear where all this is heading, but the amount of activity, creativity, and energy going into building and combining new Web-based services is large and growing, in a way we haven’t seen since about 1994, when the Internet first started to take off.

Some data points:

Paolo Valdemarin summed it up thus:

Basically what is happening is that every piece of information, every idea, every concept, every document is getting its own url. You can access it and reuse it. All borders between you desktop and the rest of the universe are fading, you can borrow the search capabilities of Google’s powerful servers from within your favourite application, or you can read news from the New York Times on the same page containing the news from your co-worker telling you what’s up today.

It’s safe to say that we’re in the period of wild experimentation and innovation, where no one really knows what they’re doing or has a complete vision of what is to come. But it’s also safe to say that we’re going there fast, and it will change the way we use computers (again). And the ride itself is going to be a lot of fun.

Buckle up!

What’s Next?

Dave Winer is at the heart of all this energy, he’s involved with or creating every one of the major elements that make up this exciting soup.

Dave Winer is at the heart of all this energy, he’s involved with or creating every one of the major elements that make up this exciting soup. He’s written a bit about what he thinks is next:

Before this release, from Google’s point of view, we were all users. Now some of us are developers. We get another chance to define what that means, based on what we learned being developers for Apple, IBM, Apple again, Netscape, the Internet, Microsoft and now the Internet again. It’s a good time for a fresh start.

We’re at the Hello World stage again. It’s like the hobbyist period of personal computing, or MacWrite/MacPaint in 1984, or the early days of the Web when the blink tag was a minor miracle. Same idea.

DigitalConsumer.org

DigitalConsumer.org is a new organization whose purpose is to promote a Consumer Technology Bill of Rights, to “positively assert a consumer’s rights to fair use, […] and guarantee [the] ability to use digital media in the way that you choose.”

DigitalConsumer.org is a new organization whose purpose is to promote a Consumer Technology Bill of Rights, to “positively assert a consumer’s rights to fair use, […] and guarantee [the] ability to use digital media in the way that you choose.”

So what does this mean for you? It means it’s now extremely easy for you to let the politicians in Washington know that you don’t want to lose the ability to download music you’ve purchased on CD to your MP3 player, or the ability to play CDs on your computer, etc. DigitalConsumer.org can fax your letter of support for the Bill of Rights to your elected representatives, simply by entering your name and address on a web form.

Do it today!

Panic Room

Jodie Foster’s Panic Room is a very solid, very tense thriller. Recommended.

I saw Jodie Foster’s Panic Room yesterday. Very solid, very tense thriller. Jodie is awesome, Forest Whitaker is his usual excellent self, and Dwight Yoakam, of all people, is the scarier of the two psychos in the movie.

The writing is excellent. This isn’t a movie filled with jack-in-the-box surprises that make you jerk in your seat (or scream), but does have plenty of “faster, faster” moments where you’re trying to help out by leaning into where you want things to go. The movie plays fair: no tricks or rabbits out of a hat to end the picture — something that happens all too often in this kind of film. Highly recommended.

Consensus at Lawyerpoint

A new EFF weblog with the aim of being a true account of the undertakings of the Broadcast Protection Discussion Group. If you care about technology, this blog is virtually guaranteed to make you angry.

Consensus at Lawyerpoint is a new weblog by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), which aims to give ordinary people access to information and visibility into the process of decision-making and deal-brokering by the Broadcast Protection Discussion Group.

In other words, this blog aims to give you a day-by-day, blow-by-blow description of how Big Entertainment really is trying to take away our digital rights. If you care about the future of technology, this blog is virtually guaranteed to make you angry.

Which is why you should read it. Get angry now, while you can still do something about it!