No Migration, Yet

OK, so my planned migration from the dying server to the brand new server didn’t happen. I ran into some configuration difficulties, and I have a take-home final due in class tomorrow, so I’ve bailed. Expect it to happen next weekend.

OK, so my planned migration from the dying server to the brand new server didn’t happen. I ran into some configuration difficulties, and I have a take-home final due in class tomorrow, so I’ve bailed. Expect it to happen next weekend.

Slow Updates, Upcoming Downtime

I’ve been beavering away on setting up a new server, to replace the temporary server I set up to replace the machine that died while we were in France. This weekend will probably be the big swap, where I copy all the data from the old server to the new. The new server will be a _lot_ more quiet, because that’s my new Big Thing.

I’ve been very light on updates here recently, as I’ve been beavering away on setting up a new server, to replace the temporary server I set up to replace the machine that died while we were in France.

I decided to build my own PC, because my new thing is quiet, as in less noise. I have way too much ambient noise in the office, from the three computers that are constantly running, it makes it hard to concentrate. I’ve vowed to end the noise problem by the end of the year. Uh, the year 2003, if my current progress holds…

It’s currently fairly hard to buy a new PC that is silent, or nearly so. Dell has made some strides here, and there are a few specialty shops, but no one had a machine that met my other specs for price, performance, etc. So I’m building one myself, with parts ordered online and from eBay. So far it’s been very time consuming, but fun, and the new machine is so quiet, you have to lean in close to know it’s on.

This weekend will probably be the big swap, where I copy all the data from the old server to the new. This will mean quite a bit of downtime, as I’ll need to prevent things from changing on either server while I move data and configuration information.

So, anyway, if you visit on the weekend, don’t be surprised if things are not live, or sporadic.

Vacation in France

Yes, we just got back from 16 days in France. Yes, we took a lot of photos. Yes, we have a lot to write about. And yes, we’re behind on putting these up.

Yes, we just got back from 16 days in France. Yes, we took a lot of photos. Yes, we have a lot to write about. And yes, we’re behind on putting these up.

Rochelle will write the commentary to the photos, while I’ll post a bunch of stuff here. Look for it over the next couple weeks, starting this weekend.

Of course, there would already be stuff posted if my damn server hadn’t died while we were gone…

Murphy Strikes

On Monday, September 3rd, at 4pm, my flight from San Francisco to Paris took off, the beginning of a 16 day vacation in France. 20 hours later, the power supply on my server died, taking this blog, and my mail and DNS, and other services, with it. Two weeks later, when I got home, it took me less than an hour to fix. Grrrr.

On Monday, September 3rd, at 4pm, my flight from San Francisco to Paris took off, the beginning of a 16 day vacation in France. Approximately 20 hours later, the power supply on my server died, taking this blog, and the rest of my web sites, and my mail, and DNS, and other services, with it.

The defunct server is a Pentium 166 with 256 megs of RAM and a 2.1 gig hard disk, and qualifies as useless junk in those excess-and-salvage auctions of defunct companies that are all the rage these days.

I had all my sites and services back up and running within 2 hours of getting home, by moving the hard disk from that system to another useless PC (this one a 150MHz Cyrix system with only 80 megs of RAM), and running on it instead.

The dead server is more than 4 years old. You would think that it could have died a few hours earlier, or a few weeks later, and not caused me to be down for more than two weeks.

Ah, well…

Upgrading to Jaguar

I just spent much of the day upgrading and re-configuring my Mac to run Jaguar, or Mac OS X 10.2, the forthcoming major upgrade to Mac OS X. Indeed, while the upgrade of the OS itself went extremely smoothly, the aftermath kept this blog off the air for nearly 24 hours.

I just spent much of the day upgrading and re-configuring my Mac to run Jaguar, or Mac OS X 10.2, the forthcoming major upgrade to Mac OS X. While the upgrade of the OS itself went extremely smoothly, the aftermath kept this blog off the air for nearly 24 hours.

I chose to do a clean installation, archiving the previous system installation, and re-using the users and network settings. I think that’s probably going to be the most common approach that “power users” use, because we’ve all mucked around with our system, and doing a clean installation is always a good thing to do from time-to-time, even with an OS as solid as Mac OS X has been for me.

The actually installation took less than an hour of effort (mostly waiting), but then the real work began. I’ve hacked up my system quite a bit, installing a plethora of additional software tools and toys. In particular, I use the MySQL database running on my Mac to drive this site, and the MySQL installation got archived by the upgrade process.

I’ll post more about the process I went through (or rather, what the right steps would have been), but for now, I’ll simply say that Jaguar is running smoothly on my system, and the performance boost that the upgrade has brought is quite noticeable and pleasant.

No More Bad News

In case you hadn’t noticed, I’ve been posting a lot fewer political items here. It’s not because I think things are looking up, but because I think they’re looking worse and worse. I decided that trying to keep up would (a) be a lost cause, and (b) make this blog terribly boring (not that it isn’t anyway).

In case you hadn’t noticed, I’ve been posting a lot fewer political items here. It’s not because I think things are looking up, but because I think they’re looking worse and worse. I decided that trying to keep up would (a) be a lost cause, and (b) make this blog terribly boring (not that it isn’t anyway).

I am still cataloging the various signs of the apocolypse, in a separate blog that’s mostly a collection of story links and summaries. I call it The Decline and Fall of the American Empire, because I think there are clear signs that America is going to hell in a handbasket, but like frogs in a pot of water, if the heat is brought up gradually, no one will cry out until it’s too late.

At least, that’s my opinion. And as far as I understand the current laws of the United States, I’m still entitled to it.

We’ll see how long that lasts.

RSS Auto-Discovery

I’ve added RSS Auto-Discovery to this site, by modifying the source for monauraljerk, the software that runs this site.

I’ve added RSS Auto-Discovery to this site, by modifying the source for monaural jerk, the software that runs this site.

It was a simple add, and the change in output is small, but this is one more ingredient in that very exciting soup I talked about a while back.

Verisign Sucks

Verisign, through it’s Network “Solutions” division, handles the domain name registration for the majority of the Internet. And they do an absolutely terrible job of it.

Verisign, through its Network “Solutions” division, handles the domain name registration for the majority of the Internet. And they do an absolutely terrible job of it.

I’ve had my own horrible experiences with Network Problems, back when I first registered a few domain names. There was zero concept of customer service, actually getting someone on the phone was virtually impossible, and getting to someone who could actually help me was impossible. I eventually transferred all of my domain names away from Network Problems.

As much as I hate them, other people hate them even more, and have called for the corporate death penalty. I think it’s a good idea. If you have an Internet domain name registered with Network Problems, transfer it away from them. Domain Direct is a great registrar, and they are considerably cheaper to boot.

New Channel: Haightlife

Rochelle has a firm belief that people who live in San Francisco should have to justify living here, by taking advantage of unique aspects of living in the city on a regular basis. This new channel will cover some of those unique things, or other random stuff that we do on our days off, that would otherwise end up in the Miscellaneous category.

Rochelle has a firm belief that people who live in San Francisco should have to justify living here, by taking advantage of unique aspects of living in the city on a regular basis.

This new channel will cover some of those unique things, or other random stuff that we do on our days off, that would otherwise end up in the Miscellaneous category.

Today one of those unique things is going on at the Toronado, SF’s best beer bar. That’s right, it’s Belgian Beer month, and today is the kickoff.

You should be here.

Borg Journalism

We are the Blogs. Journalism will be Assimilated. And journalist John Hiler thinks it’s for the better. (He’s right.)

John Hiler has written a great article about how weblogging is changing the face of journalism. While he uses the Borg metaphor, it’s pretty clear that he thinks the changes will be for the better.

Funnily enough, Rochelle’s had some experience with something like this. Chowhound.com, a food-oriented discussion site where Rochelle frequently participates, seems to spawn a mainstream food story every couple of weeks. For example, there was a vibrant discussion about taco trucks, with many people telling about their favorites. And sure enough, the Chronicle soon ran a story about taco trucks in the Bay Area, an article we read and enjoyed.

The best journalists credit their sources and inspiration, because it means they’ll get more of it. Right now weblogging and online communities of all types are very new, but it’s clear their impact on and integration into mainstream culture is something we’ll be noticing for some time.

Back Now, Feeling Better

After taking me off the Internet for 3 days, my ISP roars back with some very good customer support.

It looks like my new ISP may have actually saved their relationship with me. After 6 or so touches, mostly me calling them, where I got zero helpful information, I finally got a tech to call me back.

Not only did she call me with information that actually solved the problem, but she called back twice more to make sure I had the information and that it had worked.

Anyway, I’m still skeptical of BroadView Networks, but I’m definitely willing to give them a second chance.